Tag Archives: EdTech542

PBL Reflective Blog: Let’s Debrief!

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Post Introduction:

During our final week in Technology-Supported Project-Based Learning, we were to make final changes on our site based on our peer-evaluation feedback.  Finally, we had the opportunity complete a self-evaluation using the BIE rubric on our final project. To debrief our experience in the class we were to answer the following questions:

  • What do you know understand best about Project Based Learning? What do you understand least?
  • What did you expect to learn in this course? What did you actually learn? More, less, and why?
  • What will you do with what you have learned?

PBL Blog:

Project Based Learning-Understanding:

Prior to this class, I had no understanding of what Project-Based Learning really way. I feel that now, after going through the process of creating my own project that I can use in my classroom, I feel like I’ve learned all the parts of the planning process and all of the required elements. In the beginning, I thought a lot of the “steps” were repetitive but after creating my own project, I have come to appreciate why each of the individual parts is essential. I feel like actually teaching a Project-Based Learning unit is what I understand least because I’ve never done it. For example, actually balancing the teaching and student inquiry will be a challenge but I feel that going through this extensive planning process will definitely help!

Project Based Learning-Learning:

I expected to learn about project-based learning and why it was an important method of teaching. However, I learned that and more, I feel that I actually understand and believe why it is an important teaching method because I created my own unit based upon it. I also learned how meeting the standards and accomplishing a lot of outcomes is possible and enriched with projects such as these.

Project Based Learning-Application:

I am very excited to implement my project-based learning unit of Choose Your Own Adventure in my classroom with my fourth-graders this coming school year. I plan on teaching the unit as I prescribed it in my detailed plans, adding materials and resources, and then modifying it as I see fit for the future. I also plan on creating many more units using Project-Based Learning as a guide once I have taught this first one to really get the full picture of what it looks like in action. I am very excited because I feel that my students are going to be immediately engaged and hooked to this new style of teaching/learning.

Reflection of Learning:  This assignment required me to delve into the rubric to assess my own Project-Based Learning project and that of a peer.  I got the experience to analyze another project and see how another person took the same instructions and guidelines and made them their own. This rubric helped me to conduct an in-depth analysis of my own project and the things I needed to change to make it easier to understaNnd and implement. Finally, I synthesized the information I learned to perfect my PBL project.

  • AECT Standard 1 Content Knowledge: Upon creating my Project Based Learning unit site I demonstrated that I have the knowledge necessary to create, use, assess, and manage theoretical and practical applications of educational technologies and processes.
  • AECT Standard 2 Content Pedagogy: Upon creating my Project Based Learning unit site I develop as a reflective practitioner that was able to demonstrate effective implementation of educational technologies and processes based on contemporary content and pedagogy.
  • AECT Standard 4 Professional Knowledge and Skills: While creating my Project Based Learning unit site I designed, developed, implemented, and evaluated sources to create a technology-rich learning environment (unit) within a supportive community of practice.

References: N/A

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PBL Reflective Blog: Perfect & Reflect

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Post Introduction:

During our fifth week in Technology-Supported Project-Based Learning, we were to perfect our project and reflect on our final project. We also closely analyzed our assessment plans and made any revisions or additions. Finally, we had the opportunity to participate in  informal peer reviews. We were to:

  • Read & review various resources on managing the process
  • Finalize our project & add any new content to our PBL project site.
  • Revise & refine our assessment plan to better reflect any changes we’ve made to our project – especially changes in student outcomes or standards addressed.
  • Use the Project Design Rubric as a guide for providing feedback to the project of one classmate in the discussion forum
  • Reflect on the following questions:
    • Who will you involve in the post-project reflection process?
    • What will the process look like?
    • Is it just a one-time assessment?

PBL Blog:

Post-Project Reflection Process:

BIE describes “debriefing” as the multi-person process will assist you in understanding how you can apply your current project experience to projects you may attempt in the future. I will engage in this post-project reflection process with my grade level team because we teach students of the same population and have similar struggles. I know I can count on them to get an honest evaluation of my work. This will look like them reviewing the project beforehand and suggesting any changes or adjustments that they notice. It may even include ideas on how to improve or modify for our students This is not just a one-time assessment, we will do this continuously throughout the process as inevitably things come up or ideas are developed, especially once the children are involved as they have a say in the project as well. After the project has been completed in the classrooms, we will come together once again. In order for this process to be successful,  I need to graciously receive their suggestions and apply it to my project. This is a continuous reflection and modification as that is how projects are perfected and become unique to ourselves.

 

Reflection of Learning:  This assignment required me to delve into the rubric to assess my own Project-Based Learning project and that of a peer.  I got the experience to analyze another project and see how another person took the same instructions and guidelines and made them their own. This rubric helped me to conduct an indepth analysis of my own project and the things I needed to change to make it easier to understand and implement. Finally, I synthesized the information I learned to perfect my PBL project.

  • AECT Standard 4.3 Reflection on Practice: To further delve into perfecting my project-based learning project and refletion I analyzed and interpreted the rubric and a peer’s project. This helped me enhance my own project to meet both mine & my instructors expectations.

References:

PBL Reflective Blog: Managing the Process

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Post Introduction:

During our fifth week in Technology-Supported Project-Based Learning, we were to further delve into Project-Based Learning and explore managing the process of our project and help us tie loose ends like technology, differentiated instruction, and reflection methods. We were to:

  • Read & review various resources on managing the process
  • Develop our Products and Performances page with information on our Culminating Activity, Assessment for my Culminating Activity, & Reflection Methods
  • Develop our Teaching and Learning Guide with information on Differentiated Instruction & Technology Support
  • Reflect on criticism & rationale for implementing PBL by considering the following questions:
    • What are some potential criticisms that you might receive from administrators, parents, and colleagues?
    • How will you respond to those criticisms?
    • What rationale can you give for incorporating PBL into your repertoire of effective instructional strategies?
  • Reflect on the change in our role of a teacher & the skills of an effective facilitator by considering the following questions:
    • Will my role in the teaching/learning process change?
    • What are the skills of effective facilitation?
    • Will the students develop the competencies and skills needed to be successful?
    • What changes will you need to make in order to become an effective facilitator in your PBL unit?

PBL Blog:

Criticism & responses upon implementing PBL:

Upon implementing PBL there may be some push back from administrators and parents concerned with student evaluation. The grading system is different in project based learning because worksheets & traditional evaluation methods (quizzes & tests) are eliminated from the picture. Parents may also be concerned with differentiation. The response from the teacher to this push back could be that students are instead being evaluated based on long-term learning and teacher evaluation is included in summative and formative formats. The teacher could then show the administrator and parents the rubrics and additional evaluation methods in place and assure that the teacher will be facilitating and therefore conducting a lot of interviews and check-ins that could include running records. The teacher could demonstrate how differentiation is included in the planning process to ensure all learner’s needs are being met. Criticism from colleagues could include that students are not “learning” the curriculum and that the teacher is not “working” and “teaching” or addressing the standards because teaching in the PBL world looks very different than in the traditional classroom. The response from the teacher could be to invite colleagues to familiarize themselves with project-based learning and the extensive efforts that go into planning projects to ensure standards are being addressed. The teacher could also educate their colleagues on the role of the teacher in a student directed environment vs a teacher-directed environment and the benefits of letting students explore. Finally, the colleagues class could come see the final presentations (if applicable) to understand the depth of knowledge the students acquire through PBL.

Rational for implementing PBL:

 

Project Based Learning (PBL) changes the role of the educator from one of a teacher to a facilitator, but it also changes the role of the students. In PBL students are much more engaged because they are in the driver seat to learn in practice and applicability through projects with real life connections, not just theory.  Since the classroom environment changes from a rigid format to a more open and flexible learning space, it allows students to feel comfortable asking questions, making mistakes, solving problems, and finding connections between what they are doing in the classroom and the real world. Project based learning creates an environment where students enjoy learning & that is always the goal of a classroom teacher! 

The teacher’s & student’s role in PBL & effective facilitation:

In Project Based Learning, the role of the teacher moves from one of a vessel of knowledge to that of a facilitator of knowledge. The students role in learning changes from a dictated learning of concepts and regurgitation of information to an inquiry process. In this process, students base their learning on driving questions and often times develop further questions along the process. This teaches students and teachers that learning is a fluid continuous lifelong process. In order for the teacher to be an effective facilitator, they need to a person who:

  • Is a great, detailed and thorough planner
  • Frames the learning effectively by having thorough plans
  • Works on Idea development and sparking student interest & creativity
  • Is constantly scheduling consultation & allowing continuous revision
  • Provides opportunities for self and peer feedback
  • Organizes a presentation for the school or community

If the teacher follows through with their role as a facilitator and ensures that they have planned extensively the entire project and all of the components students will develop the competencies and skills needed to be successful. This is because great care has been taken by the instructor to ensure all of the details, possible hurdles, and extensions have been thoroughly analyzed and preplanned.

Myself as an effective facilitator in this project:

In order for me to become an effective facilitator in my PBL unit, I have already gotten started down the right path by ensuring that I have thoroughly analyzed all aspects of the project and have planned each component extensively. Furthermore, upon teaching, I will need to practice playing the role of a facilitator and not giving students the answers to all of their problems but instead letting them truly learn by using inquiry by posing a question back at them to extend their critical thinking. I will also need to be sure that I’m making myself available as a mentor and guide for their learning by providing opportunities for reflection and revision throughout the project.

Reflection of Learning:  This assignment required me to delve into several articles and websites to develop a thorough understanding of effective implementation of  Project-Based Learning.  I got the experience to analyze several articles with information and opinions on teacher’s roles in PBL. Then I viewed many examples of teachers teaching PBL to be able to conduct an indepth analysis of my own role in my project. Finally, I synthesized the information I learned to decide upon my role as a facilitator of PBL.

  • AECT Standard 4.3 Reflection on Practice: To further delve into effective implementation of project-based learning and identify the role of a facilitator in PBL, I needed to analyze and interpret various examples and reflect on the effectiveness of their design to enhance my own project.

References:

PBL Reflective Blog: Planning & Preparing

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Post Introduction:

During our fourth week in Technology-Supported Project-Based Learning, we were to further delve into Project-Based Learning and further plan and prepare. Furthermore, we were to complete the following:

  • Review the Readings and Resources
  • Complete the Student Learning Guide, Timeline, Entry Event & Tools & Resources pages in our PBL site. Mine can be found here.
  • Discuss the inclusion of the Internet or a Web 2.0 tool into our project.
  • Read this article by Jamie McKenzie: Scaffolding in PBL to learn about online resources and scaffolding for PBL.
  • Reflect on the importance of scaffolding in PBL and discuss how we will address this issue in our project.

PBL Blog:

Internet/Web 2.0 Inclusion: The internet facilitates the learning, collaborating, and presentation process for PBL projects to be enhanced. In this project, students final summative assessment project will be creating a WebQuest using Weebly where they will combine their family’s histories with those of one other student and develop outcomes based on historical probability. Student teams will present their adventures in an interactive presentation with an audience of parents and other students;  the use of Web 2.0 via a WebQuest will facilitate this process. Students will also be utilizing Google Docs for many of the formative assessment pieces to facilitate collaboration between partners and sharing for peer review of assignments.

 

Scaffolding in PBL: This PBL project’s summative assessment is a collaborative project where the students will be creating a WebQuest

Scaffolding in this Project: In this project, scaffolding is addressed in many different ways, some of these are listed below:

  • Working in groups vs. Working independently
  • Reading articles and readers with partners
  • Handouts to provide background information (for those without)
  • Handouts to provide more information (guide thinking & inquiry process)

Reflection of Learning:  The assignments for this week required me to delve into several articles and websites to develop a thorough understanding of planning & preparation in Project-Based Learning.  I got the experience to analyze several articles with information and opinions on developing a plan. Then I viewed many examples of various projects (provided by the professor) to ensure I was on track. Finally, I synthesized the information I learned to create my own plans.

  • AECT Standard 4.3 Reflection on Practice: To further delve into what the planning & preparation process looks like in project-based learning and develop my own plans, I needed to analyze and interpret various the different steps of the process by reflecting on others projects and informative resources.

References:

PBL Reflective Blog: Assessment

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Post Introduction:

During our fourth week in Technology-Supported Project-Based Learning, we were to further delve into Project-Based Learning and explore assessments to help solidify our Project and help us formulate our own formative & summative assessments. We were to:

  • Read & review various assessment resources
  • Develop our assessment plan with at least 2 formative and 1 summative assessments & a rubric for our project. The Assessment Page of my PBL site can be found here.
  • Discuss how our planned assessments meet the key requirements for effective assessments.
  • Reflect on how we might adjust our teaching during our project to allow more student input in the evaluation process.

PBL Blog:

Effective Assessments: Assessment is not separate from instruction in Project Based Learning. It is the driving piece for all instruction throughout the unit.  Effective assessments are those that:

  • Evaluate higher-order thinking skills
  • Are aligned with content learning objectives
  • Are aligned with 21st-century skills
  • Integrate content with process to demonstrate knowledge
  • Integrate inquiry to produce a quality product
  • Capture the process of learning, as well as the end result.
  • Provide information about how to continue to develop skills, knowledge, & abilities
  • Include: collaboration, communication, problem-solving, & teamwork (ideally)
  • Are dynamic, experiential and non-standardized
  • Capture the process of learning, as well as the end result

Effective Assessment in this PBL project: This PBL project’s summative assessment is a collaborative project where the students will be creating a WebQuest using Weebly where they will combine their family’s histories with those of one other student and develop outcomes based on historical probability. Student teams present their adventures in an interactive presentation with an audience of parents and other students.To do so, students will have to use higher order thinking skills and a great deal of inquiry to demonstrate their mastery of the aligned standards and objectives.This will demonstrate their learning as students explore Idaho History and their family history by answering the Driving Question, “What makes people take a risk and migrate to a different place?” Using examples of risk taking from personal stories of their family and Idaho history, taken from a variety of literary contexts, including a novel Inside Out & Back Again, Idaho Adventure textbook, and other short stories, students create their own Choose Your Own Adventure interactive WebQuest stories. This will result in a dynamic, experiential, non-standardized piece that students should be proud of showcasing to others.

Student Input in Evaluation Process: When presenting this and other Project Based Learning lessons in the classroom, things will change throughout the process. Student input is a vital component in the development of an effective lesson. Therefore, in this PBL project, students may have the opportunity to develop alternative summative assessment final projects that meet the same requirements. For example, instead of creating a WebQuest, students may want to create a board game or write a short book. The guidelines for the assignment are open enough to allow for this creativity yet provide enough structure to ensure success and clarity.

Reflection of Learning:  This assignment required me to delve into several articles and websites to develop a thorough understanding of Effective Assessments for Project-Based Learning.  I got the experience to analyze several articles with information and opinions on assessments. Then I viewed many examples of various assessment ideas to analyze if they would be effective or not for my project. Finally, I synthesized the information I learned to decide upon my own formative & summative assessments.

  • AECT Standard 4.3 Reflection on Practice: To further delve into what effective assessments look like in project-based learning and identify various assessment types, I needed to analyze and interpret various assessments and reflect on the effectiveness of their design to enhance my own formative and summative assessments.

References:

PBL Reflective Blog: Driving Questions

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Post Introduction:

During our third week in Technology-Supported Project-Based Learning, we were to further delve into Project-Based Learning and explore driving questions to help solidify our Project Idea and help us formulate our own driving question. We were to:

  • Decide upon our driving question
  • Develop at least 10 sub-questions
  • Identify characteristics of a quality driving question
  • Explain how our driving question has the characteristics of a quality driving question
  • Describe how an entire unit can be created around our driving question by explaining our list of sub-questions.
  • Reflect on what we’ve learned this week, as we’ve have settled on an idea for our project.
  • Comment on the tools we are using or the resources we have reviewed

PBL Blog:

What are driving questions: Driving questions are the foundation of either a successful or unsuccessful PBL project. There are two different types of questions:

  1. Directed: low-level questions with one correct answer
  2. Open-ended: high-level questions that do not have merely one correct answer.

Driving questions are open-ended questions. According to Edutopia’s article “How to Write a Driving Question”, they serve many functions throughout the PBL project for both students and teachers and help to: 

  • initiate and focus the inquiry
  • capture and communicate the purpose of the project
  • guide planning and reframe standards
  • create interest and a feeling of challenge
  • guide the project work
  • helps students answer the question: “Why are we doing this?”

The driving question must be complex and extremely open-ended because the idea is that in order for students to answer the question they must participate in multiple activities, synthesize information from numerous sources and eventually create a final product that answers that question from their own perspective. Therefore according to the BIE (Buck Institute for Education’s webinar on writing driving questions, some of the essential components of Driving Questions are that it must be:

  • open-ended
  • engaging and intriguing for students
  • aligned with the teacher’s learning goals
  • have a real-world connection *ideally*

Driving question in this PBL project: The driving question that students will explore throughout this Idaho History/ELA PBL project, focused on the relationship between Idaho History & students personal history, is: “What makes people take a risk?“. This driving question is open-ended as it can have multiple correct answers because it is open-ended and taps into student’s lives it is engaging and intriguing for students. This driving questions also aligns directly with the Idaho State standards for Idaho History where students explore migration in Idaho and what risks people took  since students will be interviewing family members it will also have a real-world connection to their own lives. This driving question along with the following sub-questions will facilitate an entire unit:

  • What is an immigrant?
  • What is migration?
  • Why do people all over the world migrate?
  • Who were the first immigrants to come to Idaho?
  • What were the industries and jobs available in Idaho in the past?
  • Why did people come to Idaho in the past?
  • What were the risks people faced when migrating to Idaho in the past?
  • Who are the immigrants coming to Idaho now?
  • What are the industries and jobs available in Idaho now?
  • Why do people come to Idaho now?
  • What are the risks people face when migrating to Idaho now?
  • Why did my ancestors (family) come to Idaho?
  • Why do some people take risks why others choose not to?
  • What is probability?
  • What is the connection between probability and risk taking?

This question &  great driving questions: Students will need to begin this unit by exploring what is an immigrant and what is migration by delving into their textbook and other related short stories and novels. Then students will delve into Idaho History to learn about immigrants that came to Idaho and why they did so. Students will need to fast forward to today’s world and see if the reasons and risks associated with people coming to Idaho have changed. Students will conduct interviews to learn about why their own families came to Idaho and synthesize what they’ve learned with a partner to develop their own stories with the probability of risk.

Reflection of Learning/Standard Connection:  This assignment required me to delve into several articles and websites including Edutopia’s article on Driving Questions, a webinar by BIE (Buck Institute of Education) on writing Driving Questions, and the PBL Online tutorial on writing Driving Questions, among others to develop a thorough understanding of Driving Questions for Project-Based Learning.  I got the experience to analyze several articles with information and opinions on writing driving questions. Then I viewed many examples of driving questions to analyze if they were effective or not. Finally, I synthesized the information I learned to decide upon my own driving question and sub-questions.

  • AECT Standard 4.3 Reflection on Practice: To further delve into what role driving questions have in project-based learning and identify necessary features of driving questions, I needed to analyze and interpret various questions and reflect on the effectiveness of their design to enhance my own questions and set of sub-questions.

References:

PBL Reflective Blog: The Search & Gold!

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Blog Introduction:  

This is going to be the first part of a series of more informal blog posts in the development of my Project-Based Learning (PBL) project. Where I keep a reflective journal of the process, triumphs, and tribulations of developing my own PBL Project. Each of these posts will use the tag PBLblog, so feel free to follow along!

Post Introduction:

During our second week in Technology-Supported Project-Based Learning, we were to further delve into Project-Based Learning and explore some projects to help solidify our Project Idea. We were to:

  • Identify some common features among projects that we examined.
  • Share one PBL project that we were able to locate during our search.
  • Explain why we liked this project, and how we might be able to adapt it for our own use.
  • What projects were we able to find?
  • How do we think PBL will fit into our teaching style?
  • Do we have an idea for a project? Begin articulating it now

PBL Blog:

Wow, there is so much out there, it is incredible! It even got a little overwhelming after seeing so much but I found so many new resources, like always, some better than others. One of my favorites, of course, is the BIE (Buck Institute for Education) PBL site, however, I wish the projects could be organized a little further so that when you do a generic search it defines grade levels. Regardless, there was so much to offer! My favorite is the PBLU site that has projects created by BIE. Among many of the projects I found, there were some common features & those are:

  • Cross-curricular projects
  • Community involvement
  • Student Choice
  • Real-world Connections

Most of the projects I found also followed a similar format that included:

  • Title
  • Overview or summary of the project
  • List of standards met
  • Assessment
  • Schedule/Timeline
  • Links to resources for the project
  • Plan or ideas for presentation

One project that I found that I absolutely loved was Choose Your Own Adventure. You’ll need to sign up to PBLU from BIE, if you haven’t, to view/download this project,it’s worth it! I loved it so much that I’ve changed my entire idea & I’m going to adapt this plan & use it for my project.

What I loved about this project is that it takes something that we teach in fourth grade, why people came to Idaho to settle & the risk that took and applies it immediately to their own lives. Many times when we teach about immigration students see it as a fantasy world and don’t see it’s application to them. This project shows them that just like those in the past they are in the drivers seat of their own destiny and they will have to think critically to discover “What makes people take a risk?” including their own family members!

I’m going to modify this project by including some of the stories of immigrants that moved to Idaho like the miners, settlers, missionaries, etc., to relate it back to Idaho History & our standards. I’m also going to make this cross-curricular (even more) and tie it to one of our novels Inside Out & Back Again. To say the least, I’m thrilled…I search, & have found GOLD! I am going to use something very similar to this project!

I plan on having students research why people take risks particularly immigrants both in Idaho’s history’s past, the past of others from other countries, their ancestors (by family interviews), and fictional stories. Then students will be teaming up to form groups to develop a scenario where they are going to combine the stories and information they have collected to “create their own adventure” working with developing several scenarios and probability/risk associated with each, to present a culminating Idaho History & family history “Choose Your Own Adventure” presentation to other classes and parents.

I see Project-Based Learning as something that has the potential to impact my teaching significantly. The driving focus of student choice, community involvement, and real-world connections makes it so that learning and teaching has so much more value to both educator and student. I need to remind myself to start slow, as I have seen that as a recommendation in many of the sources I looked at including, BIE (which is a goldmine in itself), but to say the least, PBL has great potential in Miss. Quezada’s classroom!

Reflection of Learning/Standard Connection:  This assignment required me to delve into several articles and websites to develop a thorough understanding of Project-Based Learning.  I got the experience to analyze various situations and synthesize the information I’ve learned to solve these problems.

  • AECT Standard 4.3 Reflection on Practice: To further delve into what project-based learning is and identify similar features I needed to analyze and interpret various projects and reflect on the effectiveness of their design, development and implementation of technology-supported project-based learning instruction and learning to enhance my own professional growth and create my own artifacts.

Project-Based Learning: An Introduction

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Artifact Introduction: During our first week in Technology-Supported Project-Based Learning, we were to review a serious of resources including the website for the Buck Institute Project Based Learning (PBL) Model reflect on one of three sets of questions to familiarize ourselves with PBL. Additionally, we were to comment on our peer’s responses to continue the dialogue and increase connectivity and understanding. My reflection on the three questions I answered concerning What is Project-Based Learning, is below.

Artifact: 

     1. Define Project Based Learning. Describe the difference between Project Based                     Learning and Problem Based Learning.

According to the Buck Institute Project-Based Learning (PBL) Model, Project-Based Learning “is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge.” Project-Based Learning has been revised time and time again and the latest model (released in 2015) is called Gold Standard PBL, more on that is found below. Project-Based Learning  begins with an end product or “project” in mind, this requires specific content knowledge or skills and the learning is focused on developing that creation.  Problem-Based Learning begins with a problem for students to solve or learn more about, the learning is focused on the process of solving the problem and acquiring knowledge along the way. (Johnson, Larry & Lamb, Annette 2007)

2. Why should teachers consider incorporating PBL in their classroom?

Edutopia states: “today’s students will face complex challenges when they complete their formal education. Knowing how to solve problems, work collaboratively, and think innovatively are becoming essential skills — not only for finding future careers but also for tackling difficult issues in local communities and around the world.” Incorporating PBL in the classroom increases engagement because students are involved in solving a “real-world” problem, and do not feel the need to ask “When will I need this when I grow up” because they need what they are doing at the present time. As well as increasing student engagement, student learning is increased because problem-based learning is not rote memorization but requires deep thinking and collaboration with problem-solving. The Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice, emphasize understanding problems and persevering in solving them, constructing viable arguments and critiquing others, and using appropriate tools strategically; all of these standards lend themselves to Project-Based Learning.

      3. What are the essential components of a PBL approach to instruction?

Screenshot (11)According to the Buck Institute Project-Based Learning (PBL) Model, the eight essential components (elements) of a successful PBL approach to instruction, also found in the graphic to the left, are :

  1. Key Knowledge, Understanding, & Success Skills
  2. Challenging Problem or Question
  3. Sustained Inquiry
  4. Authenticity
  5. Student Voice & Choice
  6. Reflection
  7. Critique & Revision
  8. Public Product.

The Buck Institute greatly emphasizes that in order for PBL to be successful the instructor needs to ensure that all of these components are present within a project, to avoid “poorly designed and implemented projects (that) could frustrate students, disappoint teachers, and damage PBL’s reputation.” (Buck Institute) Along with these eight essential components, the role of the teacher changes dramatically when participating in PBL, from classroom expert to knowledge facilitator. (Boss, 2011) 

References:

Boss, Suzie. Project-Based Learning: A Short History. (2011). Edutopia. Retrieved from: http://www.edutopia.org/project-based-learning-history

Buck Institute of Education (2016). Why project based learning (PBL)? Retrieved from http://bie.org

Buck Institute of Education (2016). What is project based learning (PBL)? Retrieved from http://bie.org/about/what_pbl

Johnson, Larry & Lamb, Annette. Project, Problem, & Inquiry-Based Learning. (2007). Teacher Tap. Retrieved from: http://eduscapes.com/tap/topic43.htm

National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers. (2010). Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Washington, DC: Authors. Retrieved from: http://www.corestandards.org/Math/Practice/

 

Reflection of Learning/Standard Connection:  This assignment required me to delve into several articles and websites to develop a thorough understanding of Project-Based Learning.  I got the experience to analyze various situations and synthesize the information I’ve learned to solve these problems.

  • AECT Standard 4.3 Reflection on Practice: To write about what project-based learning is and engage in conversations with my peers I needed to analyze and interpret artifacts and reflect on the effectiveness of the design, development and implementation of technology-supported project-based learning instruction and learning to enhance my own professional growth.

Self-Advertisement Intro to EdTech 542

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Artifact Introduction: During our first week in Technology-Supported Project-Based Learning, we were asked to introduce ourselves and create an advertisement that included what we hoped to achieve in the class, what we had to offer, and a little bit more about ourselves. I created a video advertisement using Animoto, it is found below.

Artifact: 

References:

Animoto